Transfers are a bit like buying a house

And that is why you shouldn’t invest in a player until the deal is actually done.

Almost out of nowhere Chelsea had a bid accepted for Raphinha.

Journalists across the land had been reporting that Arsenal were in talks, in pole position to land the Leeds United midfielder. But they tempered those reports but stating we had not met Leed’s evaluation.

Every report I read made it clear. Leeds United wanted £65million.

Raphinha was expected to join Barcelona this summer. It was apparently the players primary choice. But the deal broke down because the Spanish giants could not meet the asking price.

Then the links to Arsenal begun.

When I first read those links, it felt a little odd. That we were being used in an attempt to get Barcelona to pay the £65million. It is a common tactic used by agents and selling clubs to try and get a move elsewhere.

But speculation began to grow and clearly we were interested.

Last week it was reported that we had a £30million bid turned down – way off Leeds’ valuation. It was again reiterated in the media that they wanted £65million.

Arsenal were clearly unwilling to pay the £65million – a stance which I think is correct. So talks were scheduled this week.

We clearly had our “upper limit” for the player and it would be up to negotiating team to establish what Leeds’ “lowest limit” would be for the player and trying and come to an agreement.

But before that could take place, Chelsea swept in and paid the asking price.

Now for anyone that has bought a house, they will know this happens a lot.

You are trying to buy a house buy don’t value it at what the seller wants (or do not have the finances to get reach that far). You are in negotiations with the seller to bring that price down. Then another buyer swoops in and pays the asking.

You are frustrated you lost the house but you could never afford it at what it sold for (or don’t value it at that).

Football transfer are no different.

Edu and the team will know what the budget is this year for transfers.

If they valued Raphinha at £50million maximum, then they would not be meeting the asking price of £65m.

That extra £15m is money that could be earmarked towards another central midfield or left back. A bit like when moving you have money earmarked to redecorate or for furniture.

Spending that extra £15m would have meant we would have had to save it elsewhere. Not refurbishing the bathroom or kitchen when we move in for example.

Chelsea needed that big marquee signing of their new era – they had yet to bring anyone in.

They had already tried and failed with Ousmane Dembele. The deal for Raheem Sterling was dragging on.

I wonder if they actually wanted Raphinha long term or just saw him as a deal they could get done quickly. Pay the asking price, splash the cash, and appease the fans.

He certainly is not a £65m player and I would not have wanted Arsenal to spend that on him if it meant sacrificing a new left back or central midfielder.

We have to remember we have already spent £85m this summer on Gabriel Jesus, Fabio Vieira and Marquinhos.

Lisandro Martinez is still being heavily linked at around £35-£40m. That will take our spending to £120m+. Is it then unreasonable to expect us to just splash another £65m on Raphinha? We do not have a bottomless pit of money.

So we move in.

Like buying a house, you are never just looking at one.

Your favourite house is snapped up by someone else, you focus on getting on your second favourite.

It might not be quite as good as the first one. It might be a little bit further from the station. Or need a little bit more work. But you buy it and turn it into a home. And very quickly you forget about the house you missed out on.

And football transfers are just like that.

We move onto our next target. And who knows? That target could turn out to be a better choice!

Enjoy your Wednesday.

Keenos

5 thoughts on “Transfers are a bit like buying a house

  1. hans andersson

    Why not buying a car? Or a horse? Let’s skip the philosophy. It doesn’t fit football – at all! Football is for the very young. And a football player who’s trying to think is doooomed. Keep it on shorts and long stockings level. Othervise it will be to embarrassing.

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  2. Robert

    This is a concised analysis of the situation. As an arsenal fan i always preferred Renato Sanches. But who knows? Edu and Arteta are left to craft our team

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  3. jod

    Never really sure about the noise around Raphinha. If he goes to Arsenal where does Saka play ? if he goes to Spurs where does Kulusevski play ? Both young, talented players who are only going to get better as long as they aren’t messed about. Neither move made a lot of sense. But that’s normal reporting. Every club is “interested” in numerous players (even if that’s news to the club) and they are all world beaters. Chelsea actually looks a much better fit to me.

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  4. NB

    The rumour mill doesn’t exactly make sense. Not sure how we should fit Vieira, Raphina and Tielemans into our already packed midfield.

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  5. Johnno

    Never usually pay much attention to the rumour mill but I must admit I got a bit excited at the Raphinha speculation. Think he`d have taken us to a different level, he`s the type of player we all hope Saka might become, pure matchwinner. That Leeds team last season were utter shit average championship side in my opinion – had plenty of injuries in fairness -. Their only threat was Raphinha and his numbers were unbelievable considering the players he had around him. Hope he ends up at Barca now, don`t want Chelsea getting him and Sterling because that`ll take them to another level again. Oh well, no point in worrying too much about other teams, we`ve just got to keep ticking away and trying to improve ourselves.
    Up The Arse.

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